The TV landscape is challenging. As a result of emerging technology in the home, the growth in OTT and IPTV platforms, and the non-linear viewing habits favoured by younger generations – TV brands are struggling to make a mark. How can TV brands maximise their market presence through advertsing?

 

According to FreeWheel’s latest Video Monetisation Report for Q2 2016, there are three types of viewers that brands need to consider in the premium video industry: samplers, catch-up viewers and digital enthusiasts. The report shows that by targeting samplers — those who start to watch a TV show but change their minds halfway through — there is an opportunity for video publishers to achieve better revenue. Samplers are likely to see a number of adverts when channel hopping and can be exposed to messaging more often. Video publishers who adapt their role and advert length to get more samplers on board.

The way people watch TV is changing. The living room is no longer a hub for TV viewing and traditional cable services are not the most popular channels for content. More people are choosing to stream TV online and across connected devices through OTT platforms. As technology evolves, so do the traditional practices surrounding it. How have marketers adapted to OTT and which platforms have led the charge in OTT advertising?

 

Found Remote recently launched a new partnership with MediaRadar, a leading ad-sales intelligence platform to understand how the major OTT platforms are diversifying marketing efforts. The results were clear and one particular OTT provider dominates the market share.

The European Commission has released its latest proposals altering the rules governing media copyright. Digital technologies have radically changed the way creative content is produced, distributed and accessed. EU copyright rules must reflect new consumer behaviours in Europe, without censoring its diverse content.

 

For commercial broadcasters across Europe it is important that the proposed regulation enforces copyright rules and its related rights, but can differentiate from certified online transmissions of broadcasting organisations and retransmissions of television and radio programmes.

Since the introduction of IPTV and OTT services, pay-tv providers have struggled to compete with the growing market. Millennials have been coaxed to online streaming services by on-demand content and non-linear programming, leading to pay-tv providers re-evaluating their business models to accommodate changing viewing behaviours. Sports coverage has often been seen as pay-tv’s saving grace. People are reluctant to cancel traditional TV contracts because they do not want to compromise the quality of their sports viewing. However, with the migration to online services still continuing among TV watchers – can pay-tv hold onto sport?

 

In the battle between pay TV customers and cord cutters, sport is one of the biggest barriers. Sports content is still predominantly owned by pay-tv networks and fans do not want to risk missing out on any of the action by cancelling subscriptions. The recent Rio Olympics highlighted sports’ continued popularity – more than 30 million people tuned in to watch the opening ceremony. However, this year cable TV providers were lambasted on social media for their poor Olympic commentary and coverage. The NBC network was accused of viewing the Games as entertainment, not as sports.

Since internet streaming platforms removed the need for cable subscriptions, pay TV has experienced a mass exodus of paying customers. Cord-cutters are turning to over-the-top (OTT) providers for customised viewing patterns and the technical ability to view content on a number of connected devices, when and where they choose. Cable providers have been struggling to appeal to cord-cutters - customers who cancel their packages and turn to online streaming services that are a fraction of the cost. Four of Canada's major telecommunications companies lost nearly 33,000 TV subscribers in their most recently reported quarters, can pay TV find a way to stop the migration of its customers to online services?

Since internet streaming platforms removed the need for cable subscriptions, pay TV has experienced a mass exodus of paying customers. Cord-cutters are turning to over-the-top (OTT) providers for customised viewing patterns and the technical ability to view content on a number of connected devices, when and where they choose. Cable providers have been struggling to appeal to cord-cutters - customers who cancel their packages and turn to online streaming services that are a fraction of the cost. Four of Canada's major telecommunications companies lost nearly 33,000 TV subscribers in their most recently reported quarters, can pay TV find a way to stop the migration of its customers to online services?

 

As is evident in the popularity of OTT and streaming – streaming services are now in 50% of US TV households – viewers no longer appreciate linear programming and instead want to choose what they watch and when they watch it. Some cable TV providers have attempted to introduce time-shifted TV, allowing customers to control their viewing by pausing or fast-forwarding programmes. However, the latest report from Nielsen found that streaming services have caught up with DVRs in traditional TVs. As on-demand viewing becomes a bigger draw for TV watchers, the process is trending more towards streaming services than cable’s time-shifted TV.

 

Last week’s opening ceremony in Brazil’s Maracanã Stadium kick-started 17 days of the Olympiad: 10,500 athletes from 206 countries competing across 306 events. Rio has been the most technologically advanced Olympics to date – staging a multiscreen, virtual Games. For the first time the Olympic Broadcasting Service (OBS) broadcast high-definition images of the opening ceremony in virtual reality, and will show one event each day in the same way. Has the surge in sporting technology shown in Rio encouraged viewers to embrace alternative ways to watch event coverage?

 

NBC began live-streaming Olympics coverage in 2008 in Beijing. That year, viewers worldwide watched 630 million video streams from NBC's official site, app and other outlets. Four years later, they watched three times that amount at the London games, according to research firm eMarketer. Online viewership is expected to make another leap forward with the Rio Olympics, hitting a projected 2.85 billion video streams of Olympics action.

Net Neutrality is the Internet’s guiding principle: it preserves our right to communicate freely online. A neutral web space enables Internet service providers (ISPs) to run open networks that do not block or discriminate against any application of content that rides over these networks. Similar to how phone companies should not restrict who individuals can call and what they say, ISPs should not be concerned with the content individuals view or post online. What role does net neutrality play in the IPTV space?

 

Net neutrality is an increasingly debated topic, with some advocates claiming cable TV is an example of neutrality violation. Cable programming is broadcast as part of a predetermined schedule, with channel content ‘prioritised’ over programming that is not shown by cable companies. The architecture that makes up a cable TV service naturally receives preferential treatment over competing online video services in the form of dedicated bandwidth on the last‐mile connection to a customer's home - implying a quality‐of‐service guarantee.

 

Following a government shake up, BBC iPlayer will soon be a paid-for service. British cord-cutters have had online access to BBC content for free – streaming programmes to their computers, tablets and even mobile phones through the iPlayer app. As a popular online sub-channel of BBC television – will a subscription iPlayer service isolate the BBC’s OTT customers?

 

In defence of the decision, Culture Secretary John Whittingdale stated that the BBC works on the basis that all who watch it pay for it: “Giving a free ride to those who enjoy Sherlock or Bake Off an hour, a day or a week after they are broadcast was never intended and is wrong."

 
Page 3 of 7

What do others think of us?

Using Perception, our customers can watch television when, where and how they want, with innovative, eye catching features and immense choice. Perception is there every step of the way, giving the scale needed and an expanding feature set to ensure that T-2’s services stand out as the best in a highly competitive market.

Sašo Todorović, CEO, T-2

Contact Us

+44 (0) 20 3868 6389

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.